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What You Need to Know About Student Loan Forgiveness

What You Need to Know About Student Loan Forgiveness

| September 12, 2022
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Student loan debt can be a huge burden for many borrowers. Since most student loans are provided to younger borrowers, they often don’t fully grasp the full details and terms of the loans. It’s also hard to know in advance whether or not your future income will be enough to maintain these payments.

With President Biden’s recent account, the new student loan forgiveness plan would provide up to $20,000 of debt forgiveness for students who receive a Pell Grant, and $10,000 of forgiveness for non-Pell Grant recipients. (1) Pell Grants are offered to low-income and middle-income students based on financial need, and the amount awarded to students does not need to be paid back. According to the White House, approximately 60% of people who have federal student loans received Pell Grants. (2)

Let’s take a closer look at the requirements.

Requirements for Forgiveness

Borrowers are eligible for this relief if their individual income is less than $125,000 or $250,000 for households.

Private student loans are not eligible, only federal student loans. Of the $1.75 trillion of debt Americans have in student loans, roughly $1.62 trillion is from federal student loans while the remaining $131 billion comes from private loans. (3)

There is no age requirement, nor does the plan stipulate that the borrower must be the one who used the loan for college. That means that parents, or grandparents, who took out student loans for family members would be eligible for forgiveness, so long as they met the income requirements.

The plan also stipulates that the reprieve is only for those who took out loans prior to June 30th, 2022. Thus, no loans taken after that date would be eligible for forgiveness under this plan. It is currently unclear if there will be future loan forgiveness plans.

The Department of Education said that the application to apply for forgiveness will end on Dec. 31, 2023. To be notified of when the application opens to apply, you can sign up at the Department of Education subscription page.

Additional Student Loan Changes

The plan also made changes to the repayment of federal student loans, including: 

  • Lowered the percentage borrowers pay of their monthly discretionary income from 10% to 5% (only for undergraduate loans).
  • Forgive loan balances after 10 years of payments if the borrower has a balance of $12,000 or less.
  • Paying for a borrower’s unpaid monthly interest. Some borrowers have paid their monthly payments but have seen their balances grow because of the interest. Now, as long as they make their payment, their balance will not grow.

Planning for Future College Expenses

Despite the $10,000 to $20,000 debt forgiveness coming to certain borrowers, it is still advisable to plan for other ways to pay for the cost of a college education. In 2021-2022, the average cost of an in-state public college was $10,388, while an out-of-state public college was 22,698. The average private college cost was $38,185. (4) The main takeaway is that even if there is more forgiveness, that alone won’t be able to cover the full cost of 4 years in college. 

Two of the most popular ways to save for college are a 529 plan and the Coverdell Education Savings Account (ESA); each offers tax benefits and can be suitable for savers.

A 529 plan allows for borrowers to invest contributions into an account, invest it with tax-deferred growth, and withdraw the money tax-free as long as the money is used for a qualified education expense. Additionally, some states offer a tax deduction on contributions made to 529 plans.

The ESA contributions are not tax-deductible, but like a 529, your contributions grow tax-deferred, and distributions used for qualified education expenses are tax-free. 

The ESA has a $2,000/year contribution limit, while there is no contribution limit for the 529 (although you do need to ensure you don't exceed any gift tax limits, and if you do, you’ll need to report it on your tax return). 

If You Qualify for Forgiveness

If you qualify and your new student loan balance will be fully paid off, this is a great time to take the next step in your financial life. Instead of immediately spending the money previously contributed to student loans, consider using that money to invest and build wealth. Depending on your goals and circumstances, you can contribute to your workplace retirement plan, an IRA, or a joint investment account.

If you qualify but the amount forgiven will lower but not eliminate your loans, there is still plenty of good news. Not only is your loan balance lower, but the amount of interest you pay each payment will decline, which will increase how quickly you can pay off your principal. 

Also, as a result of your lower loan balance, your net worth will increase, which is a key indicator of your financial health. (5)

Your Forgiven Debt May Be Taxed by Your State

For those who do have student loan debt forgiven, you will not owe any taxes on the federal level on the amount forgiven. For instance, if you receive $10,000 in debt forgiveness, you will not have to include the forgiven amount in your taxable income on your federal tax return.  Additionally, most states follow that rule when it comes to your state tax returns; thus, there won’t be an additional tax owed because you qualified for forgiveness.

However, that’s not the case in every state. Currently there are seven states where your forgiven amount would be included in your taxable income on the state level: North Carolina, Indiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and California. (6) While this reflects the law as it stands today, each of these states could change how forgiveness is taxed as they gather more information on the plan and make adjustments to their states law. If you have questions about the tax implications of student loan forgiveness in your state, please contact a financial professional to get the most up-to-date information.

We Can Help

Whether this program provides you with a clean slate or just a reduction in your loan balance, it’s important to take steps to put your money to work for you. We at Arrowhead Wealth Advisors

can help navigate your options and plan for the future. To get started, call 626-529-2362 or email deversfield@arrowheadwealthadvisors.com.

About Dave

Dave Eversfield is a wealth manager at Arrowhead Wealth Advisors, an independent wealth management firm dedicated to using a holistic, client-centered approach to help pre-retirees manage risk and grow and secure their savings. With over 20 years of experience, Dave partners with his clients to provide personalized financial strategies that meet their most pressing financial needs today and build a firm foundation for their futures. He is known for going the extra mile, giving personal attention and a high level of care to every client he works with, and building long-term relationships based on trust. His best days are when he can celebrate with a client who has achieved a significant goal, such as paying for their child’s college education or reaching financial independence and having the freedom to travel, spend time with family, or whatever it is they dream of in retirement.

Dave has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from California State University, Los Angeles, and is a Certified Wealth Strategist® (CWS®). When he’s not working, he loves to be outside, either hiking, camping, playing golf (disc and regular), or riding his dirt bike. He is a strong believer in giving back to his community and volunteers his time to feed the homeless in his area. To learn more about Dave, connect with him on LinkedIn.

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(1) https://studentaid.gov/debt-relief-announcement/

(2) https://www.npr.org/2022/08/25/1119343754/what-you-need-to-know-about-bidens-student-loan-announcement

(3) https://www.forbes.com/advisor/student-loans/average-student-loan-statistics/

(4) https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/paying-for-college/articles/paying-for-college-infographic

(5) https://www.cnbc.com/select/what-is-net-worth/

(6) https://www.npr.org/2022/09/09/1121717824/biden-student-loans-debt-cancellation-taxpayer-impact

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